This is the website of Abulsme Noibatno Itramne (also known as Sam Minter). Comments here or emails to me at abulsme@abulsme.com are encouraged... or follow me on Twitter as @abulsme.

Categories

Calendar

July 2020
S M T W T F S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  

Curmudgeon’s Corner: 2019 Predictions Review

On this week’s Curmudgeon’s Corner, Sam and Ivan speak about the American killing of General Soleimani of Iran and the potential fallout from that action. Leaving that out just wasn’t an option. But the main purpose of this week’s show was to go back to the predictions made a year and a week ago covering 2019, to see just how well those prognostications turned out. So tune in and find out how they did!

Click below to listen and subscribe!

 1-Click Subscribe in iTunes
 View Podcast in iTunes
 View Raw Podcast Feed
Download MP3 File
Follow the podcast on Facebook
patreon-30x30 Support us on Patreon

Show Details:

Recorded 2020-01-04
Length this week – 1:58:36

  • (0:01:41-0:29:00) But First
    • Agenda
    • Iran Developments
  • (0:30:20-1:09:30) Predictions Review Part 1
    • non-Trump Politics
    • Trump-related Politics
  • (1:11:14-1:58:12) Predictions Review Part 2
    • International
    • Economy and Business
    • Technology
    • Hodgepodge

The Curmudgeon’s Corner theme music is generously provided by Ray Lynch.

Our intro is “The Oh of Pleasure” (Amazon MP3 link)

Our outro is “Celestial Soda Pop” (Amazon MP3 link)

Both are from the album “Deep Breakfast” (iTunes link)

Please buy his music and support his GoFundMe.

Curmudgeon’s Corner: 2020 Predictions Show

This week on Curmudgeon’s Corner, Sam and Ivan do their traditional annual predictions extravaganza. Nearly three full hours of predictions for 2020. Since it is a presidential election year there is, of course, quite a lot about that. But since we have Trump, there are also impeachment predictions. And then a bit about international politics, some on the economy, some on technology, and a few other random things too. Listen, and then tell us your own predictions!

Click below to listen and subscribe!

 1-Click Subscribe in iTunes
 View Podcast in iTunes
 View Raw Podcast Feed
Download MP3 File
Follow the podcast on Facebook
patreon-30x30 Support us on Patreon

Show Details:

Recorded 2019-12-27
Length this week – 2:59:21

  • (0:00:20-0:14:24) But First
    • Slow Weeks
    • Remembering Y2K
    • Agenda
  • (0:15:41-1:14:08) Politics Part 1
    • Democratic Nomination
    • Republican Nomination
  • (1:16:09-2:08:00) Politics Part 2
    • Impeachment
    • General Election 2020
    • Potpourri
  • (2:08:38-2:59:00) Everything Else
    • International
    • Economy
    • Technology
    • Hodgepodge

The Curmudgeon’s Corner theme music is generously provided by Ray Lynch.

Our intro is “The Oh of Pleasure” (Amazon MP3 link)

Our outro is “Celestial Soda Pop” (Amazon MP3 link)

Both are from the album “Deep Breakfast” (iTunes link)

Please buy his music and support his GoFundMe.

Must Read: The Coming War on General Computation

Here is another “you really should read this” article.  Well, strictly speaking, it is a transcript of a video.  I saw links to the video soon after it was new, but I didn’t have time to watch the video (almost an hour) and it took me awhile to even have time to read the transcript… :-)

The Coming War on General Computation
(Presented at 28C3 by Cory Doctorow, Transcribed by Joshua Wise)

It’s not that regulators don’t understand information technology, because it should be possible to be a non-expert and still make a good law! M.P.s and Congressmen and so on are elected to represent districts and people, not disciplines and issues. We don’t have a Member of Parliament for biochemistry, and we don’t have a Senator from the great state of urban planning, and we don’t have an M.E.P. from child welfare. (But perhaps we should.) And yet those people who are experts in policy and politics, not technical disciplines, nevertheless, often do manage to pass good rules that make sense, and that’s because government relies on heuristics – rules of thumbs about how to balance expert input from different sides of an issue.

But information technology confounds these heuristics – it kicks the crap out of them – in one important way, and this is it. One important test of whether or not a regulation is fit for a purpose is first, of course, whether it will work, but second of all, whether or not in the course of doing its work, it will have lots of effects on everything else. If I wanted Congress to write, or Parliament to write, or the E.U. to regulate a wheel, it’s unlikely I’d succeed. If I turned up and said “well, everyone knows that wheels are good and right, but have you noticed that every single bank robber has four wheels on his car when he drives away from the bank robbery? Can’t we do something about this?”, the answer would of course be “no”. Because we don’t know how to make a wheel that is still generally useful for legitimate wheel applications but useless to bad guys. And we can all see that the general benefits of wheels are so profound that we’d be foolish to risk them in a foolish errand to stop bank robberies by changing wheels. Even if there were an /epidemic/ of bank robberies, even if society were on the verge of collapse thanks to bank robberies, no-one would think that wheels were the right place to start solving our problems.

Or, for those that prefer, the original video is below.